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  • ICAA Record ID
    1156347
    TITLE
    Gego : desafiando estructuras / Mónica Amor
    IN
    Revista Poliester : Una revista de arte contemporáneo de las américas (México). -- Vol. 4 (Invierno 1995- 1996)
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Amor, Mónica. “Gego: desafiando estructuras.” Revista Poliester: Una revista de arte contemporáneo de las américas (México), vol. 4 (Invierno 1995- 1996): 20–25.
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    Bill, Max; Gabo, Naum; Gego; Krauss, Rosalind E.; Pevsner, Antoine
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

In this article, Venezuelan critic and professor Mónica Amor refutes the constructivist and organicist approach that has been used to understand Gego’s work. That approach, she claims, does not address the way Gego’s production undermines [conventional] processes for the reception of art. Gego’s environments challenge the position of “mastery” from which the viewer perceives a work, insofar as they entail a confrontation with the space that holds them. In Amor’s view, the production, as well as the perception, of these works emphasizes the notion of “contingency,” since the ruptures in their edges or limits mean that they cannot be taken in as a “whole.” Similarly, these works eschew the notion of interior and exterior since no balanced metonymic relationship is established between the parts and the whole.

Annotations

In this and other later writings on Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt 1912–1994), a Venezuelan artist of German origin, Venezuelan researcher and curator Mónica Amor focuses her analysis on the artist’s environments in galleries as well as in outdoor spaces. It is on the basis of these works that Amor develops her thesis on the alteration in the subject/object relationship that Gego’s work effects at the level of both production and perception. Amor asserts that Gego’s work projects “a partial, fragmented [and] contingent vision of its setting.” Regarding this issue, Amor contrasts Gego’s aesthetic with that of her contemporaries—even those who nourished and influenced her work—and discusses the possible reasons that Gego went against the grain.

Researcher
Josefina Manrique
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Courtesy of Monica Amor, Caracas, Venezuela