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  • ICAA Record ID
    1142819
    TITLE
    Con cachivaches hacen muestra de Pop Art en Lima
    IN
    Última Hora (Lima, Perú). -- Nov. 5,1965
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

This article about the installation Mimuy (1965) appeared in Última Hora, a popular national newspaper. Published two days after the opening of the exhibition, the article notes the large number of comments received so far. It also mentions the variety of materials used in each piece, which are referred to as “large-scale picto-sculptural works.” Descriptions of the installations range “from a coffin, complex mechanisms and paintings, a W.C., to a tea table where only the guests’ hands are visible.” The reviewer comments on the play of lights and sounds that surprise visitors: “When you step on the top rung of a ladder a lamp automatically switches on and an ‘infernal machine’ is set in motion.”

Annotations

A landmark publication in Peruvian journalism, the newspaper Última Hora spoke to the general public in slang and specialized in sensational reporting. The fact that Mimuy merited space in the paper says a lot about the exhibition’s controversial nature.

 

Mimuy, the first “installation” ever presented in Peru, opened on Wednesday, November 3, 1965 in the basement of the IAC (Instituto de Arte Contemporáneo) in Lima. It was the brain child of three young students at the Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería: Mario Acha (the son of the critic, b. 1941), Miguel Malatesta, and Efraín Montero. The idea was to fill one of the most prestigious gallery spaces in the city with art made of recycled objects. The first problem caused by Mimuy flared up before it even opened, when the Bolivian sculptress Marina Núñez del Prado (whose work was on display in the adjoining room) accused the exhibition of being “pornographic.” In order to be able to open the show, the creators had to make certain changes to their work. All that notwithstanding, Mimuy was supported by certain critics, including Juan Acha (1916–95) and Carlos Rodríguez Saavedra (b. 1918).

 

[For additional information, see in the ICAA digital archive by Carlos Rodríguez Saavedra “Mimuy” (doc. no. 1142462)].

Researcher
Daniel Contreras Medina
Team
Museo de Arte de Lima, Lima, Peru