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  • ICAA Record ID
    1127249
    AUTHOR
    Schreider, Frank, 1924-1994
    TITLE
    Fénix en Los Angeles / Frank Schreider
    IN
    Horizontes de las Américas (México D.F, México). --- [197-?]
    DESCRIPTION
    ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Schreider, Frank. "Fénix en Los Angeles." Horizontes Las Américas (México D.F., México), [197?].
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    Botello, David; Goez Art Studios and Gallery (Los Angeles, CA)
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This document is a brief article written by Frank Schreider detailing the motivations behind the creation and development of Goez, an art studio and commercial gallery in East Los Angeles, run by brothers Joe and Johnny González. The article considers the positive implications of the space for the Chicano community of East L.A. and its role in promoting a sense of agency among residents and increased pride in their cultural heritage. It outlines the difficult realities of life in East L.A. in the late 1960s to underscore the improbable choice of the neighborhood as a site for an art gallery, and discusses the effects of the eventual flourishing of the gallery on the surrounding area. The text cites a number of affiliated artists—including Robert Arenivar, Gil Hernandez, Norma Montoya, and David Botello,—and illustrates several images of works by these and other artists. The central focus of this article is highlighting the impact of the Goez Gallery on the development of Chicano art in East L.A. as a kernel to the construction of a positive self-identity for a doubly displaced Chicano community.

Annotations

The essay was written by Frank Schreider (1924–1994), a free-lance writer for Time and Look magazines, who also worked in Mexico City as an editor for the United States Information Agency. Though not dated, it was written in the early 1970s during the height of the Chicano mural movement in East Los Angeles. Besides documenting the formation and development of Goez Gallery, a seminal Chicano art studio and organization in Los Angeles, the essay provides a valuable snapshot of the various affiliated artists and community projects utilizing murals to beautify, educate, and unify the surrounding community. In addition, the color photographs are valuable documentation of many murals no longer in existence. Its publication in a Mexico City magazine, Horizontes Las Américas, attests not only to the González brothers’ notoriety, but also represents one of the few articles on Chicano art published in Mexico in the early 1970s.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA