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  • ICAA Record ID
    1086268
    AUTHOR
    Nunn, Tey Marianna
    TITLE
    All this beauty and color should have a place in every home / Tey Marianna Nunn
    IN
    Sin nombre : hispana and hispano artists of the new deal era. -- Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA : University of New Mexico Press, 2001
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Nunn, Tey Marianna. “All this beauty and color should have a place in every home.” In Sin nombre: hispana and hispano artists of the new deal era. Albuquerque. New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2001.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

This document is a chapter from a book on “Hispana” and “Hispano” artists from the New Deal Era (1930s and ‘40s). In it, art historian and scholar Tey Marianna Nunn focuses on the lives and works of several artists working under the Works Progress Administration (WPA), with the aim of calling attention to New Mexico-born muralists of Hispanic heritage, whom she sees as having been thus far overlooked in discussions of the art scene of this period in the United States. She notes the different kinds of training received by these artists before going on to discuss the personal and artistic histories of several of them, including Carlos Cervantes, Pedro López Cervántez, Edward Arcenio Chávez, Margaret Herrera, Samuel Moreno, Eliseo José Rodríguez, Esquípula Romero de Romero, Epimenia Delgado, and Amelia B. Martínez.

Annotations

Tey Marianna Nunn is a native New Mexican art historian and the curator of contemporary Hispano and Latino collections at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her emphasis is on contemporary and traditional Hispano and Latino art and cultural identity. This chapter is from her groundbreaking book, Sin Nombre: Hispana and Hispano Artists of the New Deal Era, on the history and contributions of “Hispano” (New Mexican Mexican/Latino) artists during the United States government WPA program in the 1930s and ‘40s. In this chapter, Nunn focuses on the painters and murals hired by the United States government to create artworks for the nation’s collection.

Researcher
Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA