Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    1083403
    TITLE
    Part III : pound for pound, 1973 May / Charles David Almaraz
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 393-401
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Other – notes
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Almaraz, Carlos. "Part III : pound for pound." Unpublished manuscript journal, 393-401. New York, 1973
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This document is a handwritten excerpt from the journal of Carlos Almaraz in which he discusses what he sees as the problem of “art for art’s sake” and the ways in which this kind of artistic outlook prevents certain sectors of society from being able to appreciate and care about much of contemporary art. He compares the respective practices of Vito Acconci and Andy Warhol, arguing that, on the surface, Acconci’s works require a much greater time commitment in order to be understood than do those of Warhol; therefore, most people cannot afford such a luxury. Almaraz argues that in order to be effective, art should be easily legible by a broad audience so that much Conceptual art is ineffective because it is only accessible to a small minority of people whose specific education allows them access to such proposals.

Annotations

Even though Carlos Almaraz (1941–1989) was never a widely published author, he was a dedicated journal writer. This “Record Book” journal entry was made by Carlos Almaraz in May 1973, after he had returned to Los Angeles. Almaraz was one of the founding members of Los Four, an artist collective that also included Beto de la Rocha, Judithe Hernandez, Gilbert Lujan (Magu), and Frank Romero. They were one of the most influential Chicano Art groups and the first to have an exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, in 1974. In the 1980s, Almaraz was able to attain mainstream recognition and gallery success, which continued even beyond his death.

Researcher
Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
© The Carlos Almaraz Estate, 2012