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  • ICAA Record ID
    1082624
    TITLE
    The Chicano cultural project since the 1960's : el movimiento / Tomás Ybarra-Frausto in conversation with Michael Dear
    IN
    La vida latina en L.A. urban Latino cultures . --Thousand Oaks, CA : Sage Publications, 1999
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 23-34 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Interviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás and Dear, Michael. "The Chicano cultural project since the 1960's : el movimiento." In La vida latina en L.A. urban Latino cultures , 23-34. Thousand Oaks, CA : Sage Publications, 1999.
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
    ADDITIONAL AUTHORS
    Dear, Michael
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

In this interview of art historian Tomás Ybarra-Frausto by professor Michael Dear, the latter asks a series of questions related to Ybarra-Frausto’s impressions and experiences of the Chicano cultural project since its development in the 1960s as well as his personal relationship to the project. Ybarra-Frausto also discusses the project’s influence on later generations of Chicano artists who—as opposed to the generation of the 1960s—has known how to further the movement. However, Ybarra-Frausto acknowledges that the younger generation, of the 1990s, is working now within an expanded frame of reference as globalization continues to alter the contemporary discourse of art. 

Annotations

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto is a scholar who has provided leading scholarship in the subject of Chicano art since the 1970s, and has influenced subsequent generations of scholars. The interview—conducted in 1998 while Ybarra-Frausto was associate director for creativity and culture at the Rockefeller Foundation—recounts his encounter and role within the developing Chicano art movement, also providing a detailed account of some of the major figures (artistic, literary, and theatrical) and events that influenced Chicano art. He also gives insights into the movement’s future direction due to the impact of the Latino reality in the United States. The ways in which globalization has impacted the younger generation of artists are stressed.

Researcher
Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, San Antonio, TX