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  • ICAA Record ID
    1082509
    TITLE
    Editorial / Dr. Jorge A. Bustamante
    IN
    El Correo Fronterizo (Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico). -- Sep.-Oct.,1986
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Bustamante, Jorge. "Editorial”. Gaceta informativa "el correo fronterizo",Año I, núm. 4, septiembre-octubre , 1986
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This document is an editorial within a newsletter published by El Colegio de la Frontera Norte [The School of the North Border]. It describes the work of the painter Malaquías Montoya and declares that he is responsible for the first mural painted by a Chicano artist in Mexico, a project sponsored in part by El Colegio. The editorial points out the process whereby Montoya and his mural were part of the 3rd Annual Festival Internacional de la Raza, noting that “Raza” signified “our people” rather than the anthropological translation of “race.” It also relates how the Festival celebrates Mexican culture wherever Mexicans make their home, even if it is on the other side of the United States/Mexico border. The mural was undertaken with the goal of being a physical symbol of this union, while Montoya and Carlos Coronado, an artist from Tijuana, would create interrelated visual representations of the theme for that year: el barrio (the neighborhood).

Annotations

The unattributed editorial was published in the official newsletter of El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, an important conduit for Mexican and Chicano cultural programming during the 1980s. The project was secured through the efforts of Gilberto Cárdenas, then a sociologist at the University of Texas at Austin, and Jorge Bustamante, the president of the Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana. Though the editorial is not really accurate in its statement that Montoya painted the first Chicano mural in Mexico, it is historically important in officially acknowledging Chicanos as citizens of the United States, with cultural roots in Mexico. The text also points to neglected areas of research regarding the relationship between Mexican government entities and Chicanos, as well as the reception of Chicano art by Mexicans.

Researcher
Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Tijuana, Baja California, México