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  • ICAA Record ID
    1052494
    AUTHOR
    López, Rick Anthony
    TITLE
    Forging a mexican national identity in Chicago : mexican migrants and hull house / Rick A. López
    IN
    Pots of Promise : Mexicanas and Pottery at Hull-House, 1920-1940. -- Chicago : University of Illinois Press, 2004.
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 89-110 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    López, Rick A. "Forging a Mexican National Identity in Chicago: Mexican Migrants and Hull House." In Pots of Promise: Mexicanas and Pottery at Hull-House, 1920-1940, edited by Cheryl R. Ganz and Margaret Strobel, 89-111. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2004.
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    Addams, Jane, 1860-1935; Hull-House (Chicago, Ill.)
Synopsis

In this essay from 2004, historian Rick A. López argues that the Hull-House in Chicago played an important role in promoting a Mexican nationalist aesthetics among the Mexican migrant community that settled in the city in the 1920s. Behind the homogeneous style imprinted in the pottery made at the Hull-House Kilns (an art program among many others at Hull-House in the 1920s and 1930s), there was a sense of Mexicanness imported from post-revolutionary Mexico, rather than born from the personal experiences of the migrants. Nevertheless, the Hull-House represents a site where the articulation and enactment of a unifying sense of mexicanidad further helped in the establishment of a Mexican-American identity.

Annotations

“Forging a Mexican National Identity in Chicago” is one of four essays in the book Pots of Promise: Mexicans and Pottery at Hull-House, 1920-1940, a first look into the Hull-House art programs, specifically the Hull-House Kilns pottery program, as well as the Hull-House colonia, Chicago's largest Mexican settlement.

Co-founded by Myrtle Meritt French, her husband Beal French, and Vinol and Hazel Hannell on January 1927, the Hull-House Kilns program emerged as a commercial pottery operation from the pottery classes taught in the Hull-House Art School. Many of the potters that worked in the Kilns were Mexican immigrants that lived in Near West Side neighborhood.

Researcher
Victor Sorell; Marcela Guerrero, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA